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Reed and Company, Massillon, Ohio - "O" variant

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One complete bottle and two basal fragments of amber-coloured American “Export Beer” bottles (what we would today consider a lager bottle) were found at False Creek Flats with “R & CO” in an arch on the base. This mark was from Reed and Company of the Massillon Glass Works, Massillon, Ohio ( Lockhart et al 2017 ). All were mould-blown and the complete bottle has an applied crown finish. The glass is thick – 5 mm or more mid-body. Diameter is 6.5 cm, height is 23.8 cm. Volume would be approximately 12 oz - smaller than most other bottles with this mark. Export Beer bottle made by Reed and Company #51         Bottle bases #51, 52, 53 – digitally altered to show the less obvious “O” below the numbers. All three are marked with “R & Co” in an arch over a number – the two base fragments are “34” with an embossed dot above it, while the complete bottle is “41” with no dot. Basal fragment #52 has a ghost “34” above the final “34”, and all of them have a faint capital “O” below the nu

The O'Neill machine Strange Mould Seams from El Paso, Texas

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Sandra Ratch, M.A. April, 2022 I do not want anyone to think I am criticizing Bill Lockhart or suggesting that he has not contributed greatly to the knowledge of bottle making in the 20th century. On the contrary, without his work, we would have little information to go on. Here, I just think I found a better theory to explain this strange mark on the bottom of this bottle. (Bill Lockhart has read this post and agrees with what I've found). In 2010, Bill Lockhart described a bottle found in El Paso that had an odd mark on the base ( https://sha.org/bottle/pdffiles/EPChap7b.pdf , p. 252, Figure 7-23). You can see that the mark is two concentric circles, offset from the bottle and at 1+ cm apart from each other. At the time he could not attribute a machine to the making of this bottle. Lockhart 2010 (2000):252 This same bottle was again discussed in another Lockhart (N/D:7) publication and the O'Neill 1911 patent was ascribed to the bottle. The image below shows a valve on the ba

Apollinaris Spring and their Rheinahr Glasfabrik

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The Apollinaris Mineral Springs in Neuenahr, Germany, played a significant roll in bringing the Owen's automatic bottle blowing machine to Europe as they were the fist ones to license the machine in Europe (Biram 1958:21N). The Owen's machine was the first fully-automated bottle making machine ever patented, and it changed the future of bottles and bottling forever - allowing for large numbers of inexpensive glass bottles to be made. The Coca-Cola plant in Neuenahr stands in the same location as the old Apollinaris plant, and most of the buildings you see here no longer exist. The spring is still present on the edge of the Coca Cola campus, and one of the old buildings in the following photographs still stands across from the spring. Arched entrance to the Apollinaris spring, Neuenahr, Germany - the spring itself was behind this building. A fountain could be found behind the arched doorway. Apollinaris plant also showing the white arched entrance to the left Apollinaris plant w

Ring Seal Beer / Champagne bottles from False Creek Flats in Vancouver, BC

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Ring Seal Beer / Champagne Bottles from False Creek Flats in Vancouver  Champagne is considered one of the most exclusive wines in the world. It is a sparkling wine that comes from the Champagne region of France grown by Champenois  vine growers. The true Champenois growers grow grapes in the Champagne district on expensive land with expensive ground conditioning practices and are sold to Champagne producers.  In 1900, the Victoria Daily Times (July 6, 1900 p.7)  had an add from Pither & Leiser in Victoria – wholesale agents:  Within this ad it clearly shows that Champagnes were doing well in North American prior to weather problems that started in the growing season of 1902. Mumm’s did especially well in 1899: By the beginning of the 20th Century, the cost of being a Champenois grower had made it prohibitive for most growers. The process of making Champagne was also expensive given the long labour-intensive process of producing Champagne, and loss due to exploding bottles. Weather

John Lumb & Co. Ltd, Castleford, Yorkshire

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John Lumb & Co Bottles recovered from False Creek Flats in Vancouver. John Lumb & Co. Ltd. of Castleford, Yorkshire, was one of the first companies in England to embrace semi-automatic bottle machine technology. As early as 1904 they had decided to dispense with mould-blown operations and concentrate on their machine line. The Simpson-Bradshaw was in commercial use by 1905 (Turner 1938:254, 256). They started out with 8 machines. By 1907 they had 23 machines, and by 1914 had 38 (Ibid). Turner (1938) does not mention which machine they started with, but it was likely the Simpson-Bradshaw machine , which they developed in house.  By 1915, John Lumb & Co. was being taken over completely by Walker’s Whisky (Johnnie Walker’s) (Morgan 2021:125), possibly ending their beer bottle production (I have no evidence of this, just guessing). Four John Lumb & Co Ld C bottles from False Creek – all semi-automatic machine made. #121 (19.4 cm tall), #122, 123, 124 The Simpson-Bradshaw ma

Vancouver's Scavengers

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Before Vancouver, B.C. had "Garbage Collectors"- or as we said when I was a kid: "Garbage Men" - they had "Scavangers". Private companies used to remove trash for people, apparently not only being paid, but also scavenging through materials for sellable garbage as the name suggests. The 1896 Vancouver City Directory   has a list of 4 scavenger companies in Vancouver - also three in Victoria and one in New West: These scavengers would dump the garbage they could not salvage. False Creek was used for such dumping events, and there are likely many dump areas underneath a lot of beautiful apartment buildings and parks in the city. But one of those dumping areas seems to have been accepted as the consolidated dump at the south end of the Cambie Street Bridge. In 1907 an incinerator (a Heenan Froude) was installed at 120 Barnard St. (Union St.). The city was getting more involved in garbage collection around this time and bought out the largest private scavengin

The Merry Widow Sauce

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 The Merry Widow Sauce Bristol, U.K. Purnell & Panter (Sauce) Ca. 1907 - ca. 1926 #30 One “The Merry Widow Sauce” bottle was found on site (False Creek Flats, 2021). It is a mould blown bottle made in a 3-piece cup-bottom mould. A small dot is embossed in the centre of the base. The bottle was about 20 cm tall (at least more than 17 cm) and 4.5 cm across on the base. The bottle is broken where there was a string rim about half-way down the neck. Embossing reads: “THE MERRY / WIDOW/ SAUCE” on three recessed panels. The fourth panel is not recessed. There is no maker’s mark to indicate who made the bottle, but two newspaper articles attribute it to Purnell & Panter in Bristol, UK. Merry Widow Sauce was created to market the Operetta “The Merry Widow”, which premiered in London in 1907 (Scott 2014; Traubner 2003:231).     Merry Widow Sauce bottle recovered from False Creek #30 A couple of ads from the Edmonton Journal in 1913 and 1914 call it a Worcestershire Sauce. One from the V